Labyrinth

Updated: Dec 25, 2020




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A labyrinth is a symbol of finding the light in the darkness; it is the journey each person must take to find their light within and carry it back into the world as a guide. A labyrinth is a non-denominational, personalized experience for all people of all ages. It has been found to be used in many different cultures for the past 5,000 years or more; including in traditions of Hopi Indians, Algerians, and the French. Tracing the twists and turns is meditative in quality and leads to reflection.


I love the imagery of a labyrinth. Life takes us through so many twists and turns, and just as we feel we are going in one direction, life turns us around and we are going another. In the path of the labyrinth we cannot see what is ahead, where we are going, or how to get there. All we can do is trust that the labyrinth will take us where we need to be and back again. It is not about an end goal or destination, the purpose is in trusting the journey and movement itself. Even when we are turned around and don't know which way to go, trust, ease into it, and we are exactly where we need to be.


MATERIALS

Large outdoor space

Sticks, stones, flowers, leaves, anything to trace the spiral

Homemade candles & lighter


OR


Printer

Paper

Finger


HOW TO

Collect and gather natural objects or objects of sentimental value to place around the outside of the labyrinth. Begin placing the objects in a large circle, then gradually spiral the pattern inwards. Some may choose to create more elaborate patterns, but for our preschoolers a simple spiral worked just fine.


One child/family lights their candles at the beginning of the labyrinth and slowly, meditatively walk towards the center as the rest of the class walks in the opposite direction around the outside of the circle. You may choose to sing a song or walk in silence. We sang Twinkle Twinkle Little Star because most children know the words to that song and it corresponds to finding light in the darkness. Once they are at the middle, they blow out their candles and make a wish. The smoke sends their message up to the stars, and the journey is complete.


If you do not wish to create a walking labyrinth, you can print out an image of one and trace it with your finger. Breathe deep, enter the journey, and see what comes up for you and the children.


LEARNING GOALS

  • Walk along edges and follow a path

  • Understand that people have different thoughts, beliefs, ideas, and feelings

  • Combine objects to make a familiar shape (spiral)

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